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她拜访了100多位护士,记录Ta们的故事

发布者: 千缘 | 发布时间: 2020-6-30 02:25| 查看数: 72| 评论数: 0|

2020年,突然袭来的疫情,让医护人员成为了大家关注和称赞的对象。Carolyn Jones曾经是一位乳腺癌患者,她花了5年的时间采访、摄影和拍摄美国各地的护士,分享了不同的护士坚定奉献的个人故事。



As patients, we usually remember the names of our doctors, but often we forget the names of our nurses. I remember one. I had breast cancer a few years ago, and somehow I managed to get through the surgeries and the beginning of the treatment just fine. I could hide what was going on. Everybody didn't really have to know. I could walk my daughter to school, I could go out to dinner with my husband; I could fool people. But then my chemo was scheduled to begin and that terrified me because I knew that I was going to lose every single hair on my body because of the kind of chemo that I was going to have. I wasn't going to be able to pretend anymore as though everything was normal.

身为病人,我们通常记住了医生的名字,但常常忘了护士的名字。我记得一个。几年前我得了乳腺癌,我挺过了几个手术,并且治疗刚开始也不错。我可以装作什么事都没发生。不是所有人都要知道的。我可以送我女儿去学校。我可以和我丈夫一起外出就餐。我可以骗过人们。但是当化疗提上日程之时,我害怕了,因为我知道我将失去我身上的每一根毛发,害怕于我将要接受的化疗。我没办法再装作一切正常了。

I was scared. I knew what it felt like to have everybody treating me with kid gloves, and I just wanted to feel normal. I had a port installed in my chest. I went to my first day of chemotherapy, and I was an emotional wreck. My nurse, Joanne, walked in the door, and every bone in my body was telling me to get up out of that chair and take for the hills. But Joanne looked at me and talked to me like we were old friends. And then she asked me, "Where'd you get your highlights done?"

我害怕。我知道被所有人小心翼翼照顾之时的感受,而我只想被正常对待。我的心中有了一桩心事。我第一天去化疗的时候,我近乎崩溃了。我的护士乔安走进了门,我身上每一个细胞都告诉我从那个椅子上站起来,找个地方躲起来。但是乔安看着我,和我交谈,就像我们是老朋友一样。然后她问我,“你在哪里做的这挑染?”

And I was like, are you kidding me? You're going to talk to me about my hair when I'm on the verge of losing it? I was kind of angry, and I said, "Really? Hair?" And with a shrug of her shoulders she said, "It's gonna grow back." And in that moment she said the one thing I had overlooked, and that was that at some point, my life would get back to normal. She really believed that. And so I believed it, too.

我心想,你在开玩笑吗?在我要失去头发的时候,你居然还和我聊这个?我有点生气,然后我说,“真的吗?头发?”她耸了耸肩,说道,“它会长回来的。”在那一时刻,她提及了一件我忽略的事情,那就是在某个时刻,我的生活会回归正常。她真的这么认为。我也这么认为。

Now, worrying about losing your hair when you're fighting cancer may seem silly at first, but it's not just that you're worried about how you're going to look. It's that you're worried that everybody's going to treat you so carefully. Joanne made me feel normal for the first time in six months. We talked about her boyfriends, we talked about looking for apartments in New York City, and we talked about my reaction to the chemotherapy -- all kind of mixed in together. And I always wondered, how did she so instinctively know just how to talk to me?

乍一看,和癌症斗争的时候担心失去头发有点可笑,但那不仅仅是担心你的外貌。你担心的是所有人都会小心翼翼的对待你。在六个月里,乔安第一次让我感到了正常。我们谈她的男朋友,我们谈在纽约租房子,我们谈我对化疗的反应——乱七八糟的都有。我总是在想,她是怎么知道如何和我聊天的?

Joanne Staha and my admiration for her marked the beginning of my journey into the world of nurses. A few years later, I was asked to do a project that would celebrate the work that nurses do. I started with Joanne, and I met over 100 nurses across the country. I spent five years interviewing, photographing and filming nurses for a book and a documentary film. With my team, we mapped a trip across America that would take us to places dealing with some of the biggest public health issues facing our nation -- aging, war, poverty, prisons. And then we went places where we would find the largest concentration of patients dealing with those issues. Then we asked hospitals and facilities to nominate nurses who would best represent them.

乔安·斯塔和我对于她的崇敬标志着我在护士世界旅程的开始。几年之后,我应邀负责一个项目,这个项目就是为了歌颂护士的工作。我从乔安开始,拜访了全国超过100个护士。五年内,为了一本书和一部记录片,我采访护士,给她们拍照、录像。和我的团队一起,我们规划路线,去了美国许多地方,在那里,人们正在解决我们国家面临的几个最大的公共卫生问题——老龄化、战争、贫困、犯罪。我们还去了一些地方,那里有很多很多的病人,他们正在与这些问题抗争。然后,我们请医院等机构推荐了最能够代表他们的护士。

One of the first nurses I met was Bridget Kumbella. Bridget was born in Cameroon, the oldest of four children. Her father was at work when he had fallen from the fourth floor and really hurt his back. And he talked a lot about what it was like to be flat on your back and not get the kind of care that you need. And that propelled Bridget to go into the profession of nursing. Now, as a nurse in the Bronx, she has a really diverse group of patients that she cares for, from all walks of life, and from all different religions. And she's devoted her career to understanding the impact of our cultural differences when it comes to our health. She spoke of a patient -- a Native American patient that she had -- that wanted to bring a bunch of feathers into the ICU. That's how he found spiritual comfort. And she spoke of advocating for him and said that patients come from all different religions and use all different kinds of objects for comfort; whether it's a holy rosary or a symbolic feather, it all needs to be supported.

我遇见的前几个护士之一是布里奇·昆贝拉。布里奇生于喀麦隆,是四个孩子中最年长的那个。她的父亲在工作时从四楼掉了下来,背部伤的很重。他聊了很多关于当人平躺时的感觉,还有没有得到需要的照料。这促使布里奇进入护理行业。现在,身为一名在布朗的护士,她要照顾各种各样的病人,他们来自各行各业,而且他们的信仰也不尽相同。而她致力于从我们自身健康的角度理解文化差异带来的影响。她说起一个病人——一个印第安人——想带着一束羽毛进入ICU。那是他找到心灵安慰的方法。她说道为他申辩:病人有着不同的宗教信仰,采用不同的方法寻找慰藉;不论是圣玫瑰还是羽饰,我们都应支持尊重。

This is Jason Short. Jason is a home health nurse in the Appalachian mountains, and his dad had a gas station and a repair shop when he was growing up. So he worked on cars in the community that he now serves as a nurse. When he was in college, it was just not macho at all to become a nurse, so he avoided it for years. He drove trucks for a little while, but his life path was always pulling him back to nursing. As a nurse in the Appalachian mountains, Jason goes places that an ambulance can't even get to. In this photograph, he's standing in what used to be a road. Top of the mountain mining flooded that road, and now the only way for Jason to get to the patient living in that house with black lung disease is to drive his SUV against the current up that creek. The day I was with him, we ripped the front fender off the car. The next morning he got up, put the car on the lift, fixed the fender, and then headed out to meet his next patient. I witnessed Jason caring for this gentleman with such enormous compassion, and I was struck again by how intimate the work of nursing really is.

这是詹森·沙瓦特。詹森是阿巴拉契亚山脉上的一名男家庭保健护士,在他小时候,他父亲经营着一个加油站和修理铺。所以他原来在社区里和车子打交道,而现在他是个护士。他在大学时,当一名护士被认为没有男子气概,所以他多年来没有动过这个念头。他开了一会儿卡车,但是他的人生轨迹总将他拽回到护士这条道路上。作为在阿巴拉契亚山脉上的一名护士,詹森常常去到那些救护车没法到达的地方。这张照片里,他站在曾经是条路的地方。山顶的石头吞噬了道路,现在詹森去到患有黑肺病患者家里的唯一途径只有开着他的SUV逆溪流而上。我和他在一起的那天,车的前挡板坏了。第二天早上他醒来,将车用千斤顶顶起来,修理挡板,然后径直去拜访他的下一个病人。我见证了詹森是如此关爱的去照顾那个病人,而且我也再次惊讶于护士工作的亲密性。

When I met Brian McMillion, he was raw. He had just come back from a deployment and he hadn't really settled back in to life in San Diego yet. He talked about his experience of being a nurse in Germany and taking care of the soldiers coming right off the battlefield. Very often, he would be the first person they would see when they opened their eyes in the hospital. And they would look at him as they were lying there, missing limbs, and the first thing they would say is, "When can I go back? I left my brothers out there." And Brian would have to say, "You're not going anywhere. You've already given enough, brother." Brian is both a nurse and a soldier who's seen combat. So that puts him in a unique position to be able to relate to and help heal the veterans in his care.

当我遇到布莱恩·麦克米龙时,他刚回来。他从部队派遣回来,他还没真正在圣地亚哥安定下来。他谈起了他在德国当护士的经历,以及照顾刚从战场上下来的士兵。他经常是士兵们在医院睁开眼睛时看到的第一个人。他们躺着,失去了肢干,看着他,说的第一件事是,“我什么时候才可以回去?我的兄弟还在那。”布莱恩会说,“你哪里都不会去。你已经奉献了太多,兄弟。”布莱恩是一名护士,也是一名见证了战斗的战士。所以他能够设身处地,和他照顾的老兵有所联系,并帮助治疗他们。

This is Sister Stephen, and she runs a nursing home in Wisconsin called Villa Loretto. And the entire circle of life can be found under her roof. She grew up wishing they lived on a farm, so given the opportunity to adopt local farm animals, she enthusiastically brings them in. And in the springtime, those animals have babies. And Sister Stephen uses those baby ducks, goats and lambs as animal therapy for the residents at Villa Loretto who sometimes can't remember their own name, but they do rejoice in the holding of a baby lamb. The day I was with Sister Stephen, I needed to take her away from Villa Loretto to film part of her story. And before we left, she went into the room of a dying patient. And she leaned over and she said, "I have to go away for the day, but if Jesus calls you, you go. You go straight home to Jesus." I was standing there and thinking it was the first time in my life I witnessed that you could show someone you love them completely by letting go. We don't have to hold on so tightly. I saw more life rolled up at Villa Loretto than I have ever seen at any other time at any other place in my life.

这是史蒂芬修女,她在威斯康辛一个叫洛伦塔村的地方开了一家疗养院。这个地方见证了她的一生。她小时候希望她家能住在农场上,所以一有机会收养当地的农场动物,她就会十分热情的带它们回家。春天,动物们有了宝宝。史蒂芬修女用那些鸭宝宝、羊宝宝给洛伦塔里那些有时不能记住自己名字的人做动物治疗,但是他们确实享受抱着羊宝宝的时刻。我和史蒂芬修女在一起的那天,我需要带她离开洛伦塔村去拍摄她故事的一部分。在我们离开前,她走进了一个将死病人的屋子。她靠过去,说到,“我要离开一天,但如果耶稣呼唤了你,你就走吧。你回家,去见耶稣。”我站在那里,思考着,这是我人生中第一次见到你可以完全通过放手表达对他人的热爱。我们不需要抓紧不放。我在洛伦塔村见证了比在其他任何地方,任何时间都要多的离世。

We live in a complicated time when it comes to our health care. It's easy to lose sight of the need for quality of life, not just quantity of life. As new life-saving technologies are created, we're going to have really complicated decisions to make. These technologies often save lives, but they can also prolong pain and the dying process. How in the world are we supposed to navigate these waters? We're going to need all the help we can get. Nurses have a really unique relationship with us because of the time spent at bedside. During that time, a kind of emotional intimacy develops.

谈及医疗保健时,我们生活在一个复杂的时代。我们非常容易忽视生命的质量,而不仅仅是生命的数量。当新的救命技术被发明出来时,我们面临着十分复杂的选择。这些技术往往拯救了生命,但是它们也会延长死亡带来的痛苦。我们应该怎么引导这些技术?我们需要我们所能得到的所有帮助。护士因为在我们床边度过的时间,和我们有着独特的关系。在那段时间,情感上的亲近油然而生。

This past summer, on August 9, my father died of a heart attack. My mother was devastated, and she couldn't imagine her world without him in it. Four days later she fell, she broke her hip, she needed surgery and she found herself fighting for her own life. Once again I found myself on the receiving end of the care of nurses -- this time for my mom. My brother and my sister and I stayed by her side for the next three days in the ICU. And as we tried to make the right decisions and follow my mother's wishes, we found that we were depending upon the guidance of nurses. And once again, they didn't let us down. They had an amazing insight in terms of how to care for my mom in the last four days of her life. They brought her comfort and relief from pain. They knew to encourage my sister and I to put a pretty nightgown on my mom, long after it mattered to her, but it sure meant a lot to us. And they knew to come and wake me up just in time for my mom's last breath. And then they knew how long to leave me in the room with my mother after she died.

今年暑假,八月九号,我的父亲死于心脏病。我的母亲十分绝望,她不能想象没有我父亲的世界。四天后她摔倒了,摔坏了她的臀部,需要手术,她发现这时她在为她自己的生命战斗。又一次,我收到了来自护士的关怀——这次是为我的母亲。我哥哥,我妹妹和我在ICU,在她身旁呆了接下来的三天。当我们尝试着做出正确的决定,遵循我母亲的愿望时,我们发现我们正依赖于护士的指引。又一次,他们没让我们失望。他们对如何在我母亲生命的最后四天照顾她有着惊人的认识。他们给她带来慰藉,消除痛苦。他们知道要鼓励我妹妹和我给我母亲穿上美丽的晚礼服,或许对她不重要,但对我们来说很重要。他们知道在我母亲快不行时过来叫醒我。他们知道在我母亲离世时,过多久离开房间让我和母亲单独在一起。

I have no idea how they know these things, but I do know that I am eternally grateful that they've guided me once again.

我不知道他们怎么知道这些事情的,但是我知道我将永远心怀感激,感激他们又一次的引导了我。

Thank you so very much.

非常感谢。



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